Charles Sturt University
Charles Sturt University

Projects

3-D Sound in Cinema

3-D Sound in Cinema

Damian Candusso

Damian's research is investigating how cinema sound relates to the image in the new wave of digital stereoscopic 3D filmmaking. His research has led to residencies at the George Lucas owned Skywalker Ranch, California and at the Peter Jackson owned Park Road Post in New Zealand. The investigation explores sound as a 3D entity, and how the 3D representation of sound relates to the 3D representation of the image.

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Aboriginal young people in Victoria and digital storytelling

Aboriginal young people in Victoria and digital storytelling

Michelle Evans

Storytelling is central to Aboriginal knowledge and culture. Stories embrace the integration of all aspects of life in accordance with Aboriginal worldviews and span art, song, performance and other cultural expressions, assisting the transfer of cultural information from generation to generation, including connections to Country and kin. This project will address the new conditions facing Aboriginal storytelling traditions in 21st century Australia. It offers a positive response to the ongoing legacy of displacement and dispossession, and develops a skills-based agenda to enable young Aboriginal people to initiate and produce relevant forms of self-expression and cultural representation.

Partners - ARC/University of Melbourne/ Charles Sturt University/ACMI/Vic Health/SistaGirl Productions

Investigators - Scott McQuire (UniMelb), Richard Chenall (UniMelb), Michelle Evans (CSU), Kimba Thompson (Sista Girl Productions), Helen Simmondson (ACMI), Christine Evely (ACMI), Jim Rimmer (Vic Health)

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Tourism Telemetry

Tourism Telemetry

Margaret Woodward

The Tourism Telemetry project explores the humble souvenir as a form of telemetry – transmitting distant receptions into the stations of everyday life. Employing the lens of tourism and cultural identity in order to challenge notions of place, home, utopias and ‘remote’ islands, the project will construct a series of intriguing narratives between the islands of Iceland and Tasmania.

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Agri-tivity

Agri-tivity

Margaret Woodward, Craig Bremner, Steve Redhead, Tara Brabazon

Agri-tivity is a conceptual framework that describes the productive interface between agriculture and creative industries commonly found in rural and regional communities. The concept counters the dominant misperception in literature and policy that creative industries are exclusively located in urban and metropolitan settings.

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Working with LGBT materials in regional collections

Working with LGBT materials in regional collections

Jessie Lymn

The early twenty first century has seen an emerging body of knowledge looking at queer and LGBTI memories as preserved in institutional and non-institutional collections. This project works alongside these theoretical approaches to build further understanding of the practices of collections that themselves often fall under the radar – regional libraries, museums and archives.

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The History and Future of Islamic Art in Australia

The History and Future of Islamic Art in Australia

Sam Bowker

Islamic art in Australia has long been overlooked or inaccessible. This is partly because there have been very few opportunities for regional Australians to engage with Islamic cultural heritage, art and design. The most celebrated of our Australian Islamic legacies are situated in remote or regional Australia, such as the relics of the Macassan Traders of Northern Australia and the Afghan Cameleers of Central Australia. Despite this, major displays of Islamic Art in Australia have been limited to metropolitan galleries, very rarely appearing in our regional centers. Recent initiatives to access and investigate Australian Islamic art and design, but many of these are not yet accessible to the majority of Australians.

In order to promote cultural resilience and regional community engagement, this project will create online learning resources and other opportunities to introduce Australians to Islamic art and design. It will facilitate professional networks between Australian academics, researchers and creative professionals involved in Islamic art and design. The combination of these missions will showcase the regional, international and professional opportunities enabled by engaging Australians with this thriving creative field.

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Landscape Derivatives

Landscape Derivatives

Craig Bremner and Associate Professor Massimo Tadi Politecnico di Milano

Landscape Derivatives is a proposal to design and construct temporary installations as new speculations on the urban and it relationship to landscape that can be considered as;

  •  public spaces that are an intermediate territory between the natural energies from agriculture (landscape) and construction technology of the town/city,
  •  micro-scapes (new conditions for landscape) and not micro-climates (conditioned interiors),
  •  spaces that are generated by three factors: public life, the energy equation, and the digital town/city.

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‘Tree-changing’ and ‘lifestyle’ migration in rural and regional Australia

‘Tree-changing’ and ‘lifestyle’ migration in rural and regional Australia

Angela Ragusa

The sociocultural phenomena that has come to be termed ‘tree-change’, much like its counterpart ‘sea-change’, is a media-inspired, popular culture phenomenon applied to various expressions of contemporary Australian ‘lifestyles’.  With deep roots in ‘population change’, ‘in-migration’, ‘counter-urbanisation’ and ‘population turnaround’, this interdisciplinary project sociologically examines the imagery, life-experiences, perceptions and community changes accompanying dynamic relationships between urban-rural Australia expressed through demographic change.

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Bedlam: Living with a Mental Asylum in Town

Bedlam: Living with a Mental Asylum in Town

Jenni Munday and Emma Kearney

The data gathered in this project will provide a range of oral history material and artefacts for, the playwrights (in order to be inspired to write plays initiated from engaging with the data) and, for curators and archivists (in order to create a historical record of people's lived experiences of Mayday Hills). The researchers hope to use both the data generated from the initial data collection phase of the project as well as critically reflect on the ways in which playwrights, and others who access the material, interpret and represent the same data.

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Civic Malaise

Civic Malaise

Jamie Holcombe

Jamie is interested in the idea that photographs have an inherent melancholic quality, and how this is driven by the contextual relationship between the representation, and subsequent interpretation of an image's content. Civic Malaise is a body of creative work that explores this concept with particular reference to urban landscape in regional Australia, and employs strategies to elicit a sense of the melancholy, rather than the traditional landscape's more customary mood of sentimentality.

Such imagery blends the urban landscape with social documentary photography by archiving a cultural and social record, resulting in a kind of social landscape that can provoke contemplation and reflection. Discarding the geographically parochial, this project explores our impact on, and sometimes our apparent denial of the life/death cycle of a diversity of regional Australian locations, ultimately acting as a point of reference between our urban "civic" environment and our collective behaviour.

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Booranga

Booranga Writers' Centre

The Booranga Writers' Centre was established with the aim of serving and promoting the interests of local writers. The group has been active, through Wagga Wagga Writers Writers Inc, in the Wagga region and surrounds since 1993.

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Murray Living

Murray Living

Craig Bremner and Margaret Woodward

While the focus of the crisis in Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) is about water, economics and bio-diversity (the Living Murray), Murray Living asks how it feels to live in the region and aims to map a socio-diversity of the Basin. The regional communities located in the villages, towns and cities of the Murray-Darling Basin have been derived from the agricultural landscape. The relationship between the rural landscape and townscape is clearly defined by the historic boundaries between agriculture and urban culture creating rural islands of population clusters.

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Limiting Entropy

Limiting Entropy

Lachlan Brown and Tony Curran

As part of the 2014 Emerging Writers' Festival Roadshow, Lachlan Brown and Tony Curran produced a series of ekphrastic poems and poetic artworks (prints, drawings, video art) which drew inspiration from prexisting material by each artist. Alongside this, Curran created a series of portraits of Brown, capturing him during the very moments in which he wrote poetry about Curran's artwork.

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New Landscapes, New Languages: A Multimedia and Interdisciplinary Approach

New Landscapes, New Languages: A Multimedia and Interdisciplinary Approach

Chris Orchard and Peter Orchard

The project focuses on community engagement and the adoption of improved NRM practices of landscapes, resources and environment by developing a range of innovative approaches that have wide public appeal. Collaboration between the Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (CSU/DPI), The Creative Regions Lab & Charles Sturt Universities School of Communication & Creative Industries and links to Landcare networks and the newly formed Local Land Services (LLS) will provide opportunities to develop case studies on NRM issues and  highlight successful practices and solutions.

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Design affects : East West Effects

Design affects : East West Effects

Craig Bremner and Martin James

This research asked what people in China make of the process called design? To get a relative sense of their answer, it also asked what does a post-industrial consumer culture (in this case Australia) make of design? Using a unique survey method the resulting perceptual framework evaluated the relative grasp of design; examined whether the same evaluative frameworks exist across what is left of the East and West dialogic; and tested whether the visual vocabularies of these cultures differ.

Preliminary findings indicate that the Chinese perceptual evaluation framework is more complex than that employed by Australians and questions the ability of design to affect differentiation in a global context.

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Civic Melancholy, Brackish Songs

Civic Melancholy, Brackish Songs

Jamie Holcombe, Chris Sainsbury

Civic Melancholy, Brackish Songs is an inter-regional and inter-disciplinary project, which is funded through the NSW Art Central Regional Creative Industry Program, between fine-art photographer Jamie Holcombe and contemporary composer Chris Sainsbury.  Sainsbury has written a musical composition based on Holcombe's Civic Melancholy photographic project, and Holcombe is responding with photographic images inspired by Sainsbury's Brackish Songs song cycle (a series of songs based on a theme).  The project will culminate in a combined performance and exhibition celebrating a dialogue of cultures between non-traditional collaborators.

Jamie and Chris came together through a common interest in mediating the experience of place through their respective creative disciplines.  In relation to regional arts practice, together they challenge the rhetoric of the parochial, which is so often aimed at the people of regional Australia, and challenge tired 'local colourists' (those who advocate and express romantic notions of regional life, usually and ironically from our cities). They replace it with a creative dialogue between their respective inland and coastal regions.

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The Cellar Door as Catalyst for Wine Consumption Changes and Multiplier of Sales in the Australian Wine Market

The Cellar Door as Catalyst for Wine Consumption Changes and Multiplier of Sales in the Australian Wine Market

Johan Bruwer and Anthony Saliba

A research grant funded by the Grape and Wine Research Development Corporation (GWRDC) into the field of wine tourism. Part of this research investigates regional brand perception images of 15 wine regions in 6 states in Australia. It aims to identify the key brand elements of successful regions plus some flow-on effects such as regional employment. Stakeholders (direct and indirect) are wine companies around Australia, wine industry peak bodies, i.e. Wine Australia and Winemakers Federation of Australia, tourism bodies, i.e. Tourism Australia, state and regional tourism associations, etc.

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