Charles Sturt University
Charles Sturt University

Dr Hakan Coruh

Dr Hakan Coruh

Hakan Ҫoruh holds his Bachelor of Divinity (Ilahiyat) degree from the Faculty of Divinity, Sakarya University. In 2007, he completed his Master’s degree in Qur'anic exegesis (tafsīr) at the same university. Between 2003 and 2008, he took advantage of academic circles and centres such as İSAM (Centre for Islamic Studies) in Istanbul, one of the major cities for Islamic studies in the Muslim World. He then completed his PhD at Australian Catholic University in 2015. His PhD research is on early modern exegesis of the Qur’an (Said Nursi, Muhammad ‘Abduh, and Sir Ahmad Khan). Hakan is currently a lecturer, and supervisor of HDR students at CISAC, CSU.

Hakan's main field is Qur'anic exegesis (tafsīr). He teaches and writes on Qur'anic studies, classical exegesis, and contemporary approaches to the Qur'an and Islam. He is interested in the classical and modern Qur'an exegesis, contemporary Islamic thought, Islamic Legal Theories (usul al-fiqh) and Jurisprudence (fiqh), Islamic theology, and interfaith relations.

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  • Medieval Exegesis of the Qur’an (Classical tafsīr)
  • Modern Qur’an Exegesis (Modern tafsīr)
  • Contemporary Islamic thought
  • Islamic Legal Theories (usul al-fiqh) and Jurisprudence (fiqh)
  • Hanafi-Maturidi Theology and Jurisprudence
  • Islamic Law and Practices in the modern period
  • Radicalisation, theological ideologies, and counter-radicalisation
  • Islamic theology (Kalām)
  • Comparative Theology and Interfaith relations

Hakan is actively involved in academic associations and community organisations. Hakan is currently

  • the member of the Australian Association of Islamic and Muslim Studies (AAIMS) link to http://www.aaims.org.au/
  • the member of PACT (Centre for Public and Contextual Theology), Charles Sturt University
  • CISAC Research Team Coordinator
  • CISAC School Board
  • Comparative Theology Reading Group, ACU

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Coming from Islamic Studies background, Hakan is lecturing in Qur'anic studies and Islamic Legal Theories (usul al-fiqh) and Jurisprudence (fiqh). His subject specialities include Qur'anic studies, classical exegesis, and contemporary approaches to the Qur'an and Islam, Islamic Legal Theories (usul al-fiqh) and Jurisprudence (fiqh), Islamic theology.

Subjects:

ISL230 & ISL430 - Usul al-Tafsir (Methodology of Qur'anic Exegesis)
ISL331 - Advanced Study of Tafsir (Qur'anic Exegesis) Literature
ISL211 & ISL411 - Usul al-Fiqh (Methodology of Islamic Law)
ISL313 &ISL413 - Islamic Family Law and Society
ISL110 & ISL410 – Islamic Jurisprudence of Five Pillars

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Hakan’s research interests and publications include:

  • Medieval Exegesis of the Qur’an (Classical tafsīr)
  • Modern Qur’an Exegesis (Modern tafsīr)
  • Contemporary Islamic thought
  • Islamic Legal Theories (usul al-fiqh) and Jurisprudence (fiqh)
  • Radicalisation, theological ideologies, and counter-radicalisation
  • Comparative Theology and Interfaith relations
  • Nursian Studies

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Fully accredited principal supervisor 

Co-Supervision

  • Aref Shaker, PhD
  • Sadiq Ansari, PhD
  • Muhammad Zuberali, MA

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Coruh, H. (2018). Refuting the Extremist Interpretations of the Text and the Prophetic Traditions: The Case of Qur’an 2:256. In Radicalised Interpretations of Islam: Theological Response. Ed. Fethi Mansuri and Zuleyha Keskin, Palgrave Macmillan.

Coruh, H. (2017).Tradition, Reason, and Qur’anic Exegesis in the Modern Period: The Hermeneutics  of Said Nursi.Islam and Christian–Muslim Relations, vol. 28, no: 1, pp. 85-104.

Coruh, H. (2015).Celebrating Diversity of Humanity, Struggling for Peace, and Establishing Culture of Coexistence. Cultural and Religious Studies, May-June 2015, Vol. 3, No: 1.

Coruh, H. (2014).Celebrating Diversity of Humanity, Struggling for Peace, and Establishing Culture of Coexistence. In Paths to Dialogue in our Age 1, ACU.

Coruh, H. (2012).Friendship between Muslims and the People of the Book in the Quran with Special Referenceto Q 5. 51. Islam and Christian–Muslim Relations, vol. 23, no: 4, pp. 505–513.

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